Are some things too dirty to put in the washing machine?

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OK, you and Nan have put my mind at ease about this, and it's something i've wondered about for a long time, but never asked about it. I just have one more question and then I'm going to bed, but what's wrong with washing clothes that have some gas on them? Of course, i understand that gas is flammable, but wouldn't the water in the machine dillute the gas, and what is the risk of combustion; is it that the washing machine is an electrical device and could short out causing an explosion? Maybe it's a naive question but I had never considered this before.
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Gasoline will vaporize and there is a chance of explosion. In addition, since all the gasoline may not be removed, there is a chance that fire and explosion could occur if the contaminated clothes are put in a dryer. I would also be afraid that traces of gasoline would remain in plumbing traps. Every washer and dryer that I have ever owned included safety instructions warning against laundering gasoline soaked fabrics.
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On Mon 18 Apr 2005 02:05:07p, Cacique wrote in alt.home.cleaning:

I think the distinction is between a "gasl soaked" rag and a rag or clothing that has a few spots of gas on them.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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On 18 Apr 2005 23:19:41 +0200, Wayne Boatwright

Right. Fwiw, my washer says not to launder anything 'dampened' by gas. I take that to mean more than just a few splatters. I wouldn't have a problem washing clothing that had gotten a few splatters, after I'd used detergent and rinsed the area well by hand, first.
Nan
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wrote:

I usually do a "dirty" wash every 6 weeks or so. This load might consist of shower curtain liner, car towels, shop rags, garden/work gloves, dusting cloths, etc. I'll add a little more soap, perhaps some TSP, plus a booster and use hot water. If the water is black with dirt, I'll run it though a second time. If anything is caked with mud or has sand in it, I'll take these items in the backyard and brush and/or beat them first or they may be vacuumed prior to being laundered. Like some items dusting cloths and shop rags seem to get better with age. A rag that contains flammable solvents or finishes will be discarded. Look for harmful bacteria on pot holders, oven mitts, kitchen sink & towels, and moist sponges.
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Black water should be discarded. If you're going to re-use laundry water, it should be rinse water.

If you wash your pot holders in a machine, police dogs will alert on any clothing washed in that machine afterward. There was a long thread about it in rec.drugs.pot.
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Barbecue Bob Serving family-style roast bunny
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I soak any really dirty cloths in a concentrated solution of laundry detergent and ammonia for a half hour before washing. They don't come out spotless, but are clean enough for wiping the walls, car, hands, etc. again.
I think ammonia doesn't burn the cloth as much as bleach.
Of course any real heavy accumulation of grease on a cloth takes lots of detergent, ammonia, and time to remove, those I trash.

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