wooden doors

Hey everybody do u know which company produces the best wooden doors.Im repairing my house now and want to make it more modern and beautiful. Can anybody give a piece of advice? maybe smb faced this problem?
------------------------------------- willows_tony *** *** ***....** **...*** **........** **.......** *** **..........*.........** *** **.....** **..................** **.....** **.........** **..............** **.........** *..............* *..........* *..............* **..............* *......* *..............** **..............** *....* **..............** *......................................* **..............**........**..............** **..............* *....* *..............** *..............* *....* *..............* **.........** *....* **.........** **.....** *....* **.....** *** **....* *** ** * * *
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 29, 9:14 am, willows.tony_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (willowstony) wrote:

Mine. I currently have 2 in glue-up clamps right now. Mahogany rails and stiles with aspen panels. The rails and stiles are carved with grape vines and the panels are sandblasted and airbrushed. All will be sanded 10 12,000 and receive at least 12 coats of clear satin poly. Cost: $2,000 installed.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You should rethink your plan, Don, at least as far as the finishing. Finish adhesion decreases when the wood surface becomes too smooth, too many coats of polyurethane make the finish borderline impossible to repair without it being visible, and beyond a certain point more coats doesn't equate to a longer finish life. Post a question on rec.woodworking.
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/architecture/wooden-doors-24751-.htm willowstony wrote:
RicodJour wrote:

Thanks a lot for your piece of advice. But I heard that there is one place where I can buy solid wooden doors of high quality and they will serve to me for a long time. http://www.solidwoodendoors.com /.
------------------------------------- willows_tony *** *** ***....** **...*** **........** **.......** *** **..........*.........** *** **.....** **..................** **.....** **.........** **..............** **.........** *..............* *..........* *..............* **..............* *......* *..............** **..............** *....* **..............** *......................................* **..............**........**..............** **..............* *....* *..............** *..............* *....* *..............* **.........** *....* **.........** **.....** *....* **.....** *** **....* *** ** * * *
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/architecture/wooden-doors-24751-.htm willowstony wrote:
Thanks a lot for your piece of advice. But I heard that there is one place where I can buy solid wooden doors of high quality and they will serve to me for a long time. http://www.solidwoodendoors.com /.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You may be right, in the long view. I'll be around to find out. But I know what I like, and so far so good. Re-reading my post above I have no idea what I was typing. It should read: Sanded to 600 grit, then micro-meshed to 12,000, then poly'd and steel wooled with up to 12 coats. I've done this about 80 times in the past year and it turns out amazing. The mahogany has *rays* that appear 3 dimensional that cannot be captured on film or pixels and can only be appreciated with bare eyes and the poly gives it unbelieveable depth.
Earlier this year I refinished/restored an old gas fired floor lamp that someone refinished 20+ years ago with a sloppy stain and poly finish. It was difficult but I had to take it down to bare wood and some of the surface was sacrificed in the process. I think this is what you were alluding too, the difficulty in repairing a poly finish. The wood was solid poplar and after I removed the finish I created a giant *lathe* on my work bench to support this 5' long stick of wood with an 18" wooden disc on one end. Hand cranking one end I used my other hand to *machine* the surface with various things like belt and disc sanders and even scrapers and hand sandpaper to get the overall surface where it needed to be. See how long you can hold a 3hp belt sander with 1 hand and maintain control. This was a project I did in my spare time so time was not of the essence. Because poplar has an uneven grain coloration I stained the whole thing a neat english chestnut color and reapplied several coats of satin poly. I converted the lamp to electric, which was easy enough, and since the original shade was long gone I used a large "FLW" tiffany shade I had been saving for a long time. I turned an acorn finial for the top of the shade out of walnut and the harp and socket base were salvaged from another lamp from the 1920's. It now sits in my wifes office as a reminder that her father used to run toy cars around the base/disc when he was a young boy back in the early 30's.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.