Tin Roof Sunday

The snow slides right off that tin roof!
http://i18.tinypic.com/2uzc8kh.jpg
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Don wrote:

I guess that saves you from having to go shovel the roof. ;)
The snow cover is a good insulator. In certain areas of the country the common practice is to have metal roofing for the bottom few feet to prevent ice damming and the rest of the roof is "sticky" roofing such as fiberglass shingles to hold on to that desirable insulator.
Opening and closing the doors tends to vibrate the building a little bit, and that little bit is often the extra little nudge that breaks the snow loose. Being dumped on by a load of snow quickly loses its charm. I couldn't tell from the picture for sure, but it looks like you don't have any snowbirds or other deflector to keep the snow from falling onto you as you're entering and leaving the building. On taller buildings, with the snow and ice sheet falling a greater distance, it can't be a serious hazard. You have low eaves so it wouldn't be more than a nuisance.
While we're on the topic of winter weather, the NYC area has seen a miniscule amount of snow so far this winter. I installed a snow melting system last fall and I was eager to see how the system performed - but Mother Nature hasn't been cooperating. A couple of days ago we got a little bit more than a dusting and I was very pleased to see the walk cleared when I got up in the morning. I celebrated by going back to bed.
R
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"RicodJour"> wrote

The snow melting system is installed in the sidewalk? How does it work, electric? hot water? We don't have any sidewalks here but I'm just curious.
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Don wrote:

No sidewalks here either, except in town. The system is under the front walk and runs to the curb. It's electric due to the relatively small area that's heated - ~250 SF. Hydronic is more involved with equipment, house heating is steam, and the cost of operation is fairly minimal. There's an external sensor that kicks the system on when the contact coil detects precipitation and the temperature is below 39 degrees.
This is what I use. http://www.warmzone.com/SnowMelting.asp Good company. Excellent customer service.
R
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