Square Footage

http://blog.builddirect.com/redneck-home-remodels/comment-page-1 /
BTW, has anyone ever found out how large square footage houses are used?
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In lieu of divorce.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Yes, a bit bigger than 30cm x 30cm houses. Ken
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I thought yours was 20 x 20, Ken...
R
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RicodJour wrote:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dynamics /
Added a deck to the guest house for construction stuff, up from 8x20 to 16x20. Leveling was a time consumer, I underestimated, it's needs a 3/4" / 8' slope away from the house that needs to look straight compared to the original which has that slope. Working on a retractable roof for the deck. Ken
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That's only if the floor is solid, for rain runoff. A deck, with openings between the deck boards doesn't need to slope.
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wrote:

Yes it does.
R
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wrote:

Code is the lowest acceptable construction, not the highest. You are also no longer utilizing the Southern Building Code as you are in an area where it freezes. Time to learn new tricks, old dog!
Deck boards cup and there should always be enough slope to promote drainage, either between the boards or down slope the long way. The boards will dry out faster with better drainage, which helps minimize fungal and algal growth, and also helps with minimizing icing.
R
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I have a long history of being anti-code.
You are

HA! The only plan I have designed here in the great white north is for my own house. Almost everything else has been in the Southern Building Code of southwest Florida.

Thanks for the explanation and I don't disagree. I've built a few thousand square feet of deck in the past few years and have observed much more. It is the rare 5/4 that does NOT have a camber, or direction to the growth rings, apparent on the end grain. The high point of the curve should always face up and cupping will rarely occur especially if you drill and screw 3 screws in each end and 2 at each intermediate joist. Yeah, it takes longer but is well worth the effort.
Behr waterseal is mandatory every 3 years for algacide prevention and keeping the wood from drying out, plus water almost leaps right off of it as soon as it hits it. As far as icing goes, slope will do nothing positive for it. The only semi successful way I have found to deal with it is dense salt water sprayed from a room temperature insecticide sprayer. Coming down the heavily iced over rear steps 5 years ago with an aggressive dog leash in each hand showed me 2 young dawgs can teach an old dawg a new trick. Feet in the air, the angled railing against my ribcage at 50 mph taught me that I need to pay more attention and not let the ice build up like that. Still hurts sometimes.
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wrote:

That should say crown not camber, camber is something else, a slight bowing because of the grain structure of the board.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yeah but flying critters hide underneath ready to bushwack wifes buns through the slats. I used 1/2" 4x8 plywood on 2x4's @16" oc, supported every 4', so I can roll heavy castered tables. Ken
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That seems a bit light, Ken. Such wheels have very small contact areas and a wheel can punch through even if the overall #/SF is well within ratings. If you used something like CDX plywood there are voids which seriously decrease localized load capacity.
R
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1/2" plywood for a floor is almost never acceptable for human habitation. Even if the joists are at 12" o/c both ways the deflection will be horrendous. If you're talking OSB and not plywood it's even worse.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

5/8" tongue and groove was needed in Muskoka (Offtario) cuz snow load was a factor, especially that which may be slid off the roof onto the deck, but it's unnecessary in our case in BC, 1/2" is fine, as our experience proves. It's also subjective, I find concrete too hard and fast, while our deck is nicer for walking and dancing on. (I get my high heels stuck in between deck boards ;-), so I had to go solid).
We have a fair idea of load restrictions, just as highways have, but a work around is to park heavier loads on/near supporting blocks underneath.
We also like indoor/outdoor carpeting, so we pretty much needed a solid sloped floor. I also find slatted decks rot faster, as they collect debris between them where they are supported. Ken
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Ken S. Tucker wrote:

Oh yeah, I have a new tool cabinet, 1st pic... http://www.flickr.com/photos/dynamics /
I use mechanical sliders for the drawer slides, the pkg they come in claims they're good for 50# each, which is the weight of a cement block, meaning my unit would max out at 250# on 4 casters, but the casters are rated only 50#'s!
BTW those mechanical sliders need 1/16" tolerance max otherwise they run rough, so be careful about your cutting. Ken
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Yes, that it does. That's what they make McCulloch 9 hp 2 cycle blowers for. brrrp brrrp
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Well back in the day when the giants ruled the earth and the consumers were massively consuming they spent very little time in their borrowed cribs. They were used as a base of operations, a place to store all their plastic chinese trinketry. The rest of the time they spent on their jobs, hauling their brats all over creation and hanging out at the watering holes and wandering the malls collecting more stuff and of course lined up at the grub joints for their thrice+ daily fueling of HFCS.
Yes, borrowed. No one owns anything anymore. There was a time when debt was considered scandalous but human nature devolved to where massive debt was a badge of status and now is an albatross. For 5 years now I have owned nothing, have everything and owe nothing and expect to remain this way til I offload.
I expect a whole lot of demolition to occur in the next decade.
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