Reciprocal Timber/Sod Roof Straw Bale House


I was doing some more research on natural building and specifically the reciprocal roof, and came across this delightful work that I thought was worth its own thread:
http://www.simondale.net/house/index.htm
"The house was built with maximum regard for the environment and by reciprocation gives us a unique opportunity to live close to nature. Being your own (have a go) architect is a lot of fun and allows you to create and enjoy something which is part of yourself and the land rather than, at worst, a mass produced box designed for maximum profit and convenience of the construction industry. Building from natural materials does away with producers profits and the cocktail of carcinogenic poisons that fill most modern buildings." "Reciprocal roof rafters are structurally and aesthaetically fantastic and very easy to do" "Straw bales in floor, walls and roof for super-insulation and easy building"
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Nice. Thanks for posting the link.
R
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My pleasure.
I appreciate and can relate to the owner-builder's take, i.e.;
"Being your own... architect is a lot of fun and allows you to create and enjoy something which is part of yourself and the land rather than, at worst, a mass produced box designed for maximum profit and convenience of the construction industry. Building from natural materials does away with producers profits and the cocktail of carcinogenic poisons that fill most modern buildings."
He seems as efficient with his words as with his architecture.
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Just yesterday I noticed the straw bales Muff has stacked on the side of his yard closest to our house, that I suppose he plans to feed to his horses, has vegetation about 12" tall growing all over it. There are maybe 300-400 bales all together and from 200' away, now, they don't even look like straw bales, just a big green hill.
When used in a house I wonder how they break down and decompose (because they are organic) over time?
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wrote:

From what I'm getting, there is always a danger of just about any element of a house getting damaged and/or broken down over time from the elements. Straw is no different, but it is sealed with, and soaked and/or dipped in, clay slip and/or rubbed/treated with clay and/or lime (etc.) plasters and sheltered the way good homes usually are, such as with a good roof (overhangs) and drainage/ventilation/insulation systems. Even iron will rust and wood rot if left unprotected/unmaintained. Apparently straw bale building is an American invention by the way.
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