Re: water in architecture

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I was thinking some sort of chemical, or perhaps heavy metal, poisoning of the mother during pregnancy.

If someone is going to use psychobabble, and in English, they *least* they could do is use intelligible English. This was painful to try to read.
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<snipped>

Let's not forget that runoff (and grey water) can also be used for irrigation to enhance the landscaping around a building ;)
Esp. when combined with the use of plants native to the area/climate ;)
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"Kris Krieger" <

Why stop with just grey? Why the logs, alone, would help to make a decorative statement.
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???
Architects have been able to integrate both rainwater irrigations systems and greywater systems into all sorts of places, made from all sorts of materials. I suppose they could also be integrated into a log house, but the best person to ask would prob. be Don because, if I recall correctly, he was looking into log homes at one point.
My comment was also a bit of a ha-ha on myself because I've blithered on in the past about xeriscaping, and quite a lot about gardens in general, and about some of my ideas for a desert house with low environmental impact.
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"Kris Krieger"

LOL
Here in Vancouver, as you may know, Arthur Erikson, Architect (whose work I dislike a fair bit), has water running over some of the glass part of the roof of part of the courthouse, so that, in some areas, when you look up, you can see the water flowing overhead, to create a subtle or vage feeling like you're underwater or it's raining outside. (Admittedly, the shimmering light it casts in the interior can be nice with the right sunlight.)
Your grey water mention gave me an idea-- at first just as a joke-- of some kind of architecture with raw sewage flowing overhead like that, and/or down a transparent roof and/or through a transparent waste-pipe, such as right through the living-room. It could function in part as a kind of social or environmental commentary.
That might make one hell of a university architecture project.
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Actually, I didn't know, aside for thinking "that sounds somehwat familiar...", so I did some Googling. I didn't look at a lot of images, but the ones I saw didn't reach out and grab me.
It seemed to me, though, that Vancouver buildings got so much rain already, without adding to the look of more rain... but I can't otherwise comment without seeing it.
OTOH sheets of water can definitely be mesmerizing to look through. I designed my future pool (start date will prob. be in June) with a water feature that's 12 feet (width, not height) of sheeting water coming out of a wall 2' above the pool-coping/ground level, and a bench in the pool itself, behind the cascade. Not at all practical (although it ought to be nice on a hot day, plus it will reflect light into the north-facing MBR) (and sound great when it's running)... IOW: I can't say that I'm immune to the effect of cascading water <g!>
It's a broad topic, tho', the various uses of water in architecture...it is always a statement, that much is true. The only question lies in what kind of a statement.

Well, you do get people who make huge "art installations", some of which are fairly elaborate structures.
But I'd highly doubt you could use raw sewage, because of health regulations. The best you could do is have something that had the appearance, using silicone "glop" or whatever, and dye. Maybe thicked with a bit of inoroganic gel.
The idea doesn't appeal to me personally, but if you even did it, I'm sure you'd create a lot of buzz <G!>
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Kris Krieger wrote:

>>

>>

He ostensibly appeals to those who can fund his work-- those who may be less interested in (certain kinds of) aesthetics, and/or motivated more by money.

Exactly. You're sharp.

Sounds delightful. I trust you will invite me over when it's done. ;)

True, and apparently, universities put out housing competitions like the Solar Decathlon.

That's an idea, however, regulations-approved transparent-plastic waste-piping running throughout an experimental house should be fine. Naturally, each visitor would be encouraged to use the facilities.

Flies, right? :)
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[snip]

I dunno 'bout that, but it just seems odd to me - OTOH, I guess "Nouveau Atlantean" might also be a style, what with Global Warming <G!>

I'd actually not heard of that, so I Googled it - kind of interesting, I'll have to do more reading.
I was working (well, just in 3D opf course, since I am merely a "pretty picture maker" ;) - well, they're pretty if everything works well, otherwise they're, er, pictures... Anyhoo, I was working on trying to come up with a thing that'd use both passive heating and passive cooling. One thing that stymied me was the metallurgy/math - I wanted to figure out whether some roof vents could be opened using the expansion of metal, prob a spring such as the sort used in an outdoor thermometer, but larger of course, and then closed (to conserve heat) when the chilled metal contracted again. I also doodled out a thing where pipes would run underground - passive vents from the interior of the house would open (as above) to let out heat, whcih would draw air in through a screened vent, through the earth where it'd be cooled, and then up through floor vents in the house (that'd also close, or could be closed, during chilly weather). All of that is, of course, pie-in-the-sky, or as most people I know call it, "just more of Kris' weirded-out stuff", and I've no idea whether any of it would work - although I suppose it's better than watching most of what's on television <LOL!>
Seriously, tho'!, I think it'd be interesting and "really nifty" ;0 if there were passive ways to do some of this stuff. So the Solar Decathalon is an interesting tidbit. thanks for the reference :)

You might be on to something there. Team up and propose it, I'd bet money (not much, but money <G!>) that it'd get approval and lots of visitors!

Not much difference, flies or art critics =8-O ooooh I am rood!
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