Re: Chinese drywall again.

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On a shotgun? LOL I have a 6x9 variable on my winchester .348 but the trajectory is so high its almost worthless. Soon I'll get a winchester model 70 in 30.06 and the scope will go on that.
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hoo.ca> wrote:

Tip: Don't build it in a basement.
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wrote:

a> wrote:

yahoo.ca> wrote:

Someone's been doing their homework. ;)
Do we need a full basement, or can we get away with a smaller utility thing-- even in the north cold?
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wrote:

The intruder thing was just an echo of someone else's concern I had read just before posting that and so I thought I'd add it in what the hell. I forget where I read it-- maybe a woman's website on architecture-- but it's not really a concern of mine and there's no specific reason why I would want creaky floors. When creaks happen and they do bug people, I'm sure there're ways to quieten them up, aside from shooting the one making the creaking.
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wrote:

Like anything-- even some non-inert metals-- and your health, you have to take care of it. Then they will be all that and more in 200 years. And you, you'll die in pristine condition. Then they'll seal you in acrylic for all-time, like a million year old ant in amber.

What about night vision goggles? They're apparently using them in cinemas to spot people filming the films. Yet another reason not to attend cinemas. (What if you could cut out the customer entirely from the money-making scheme? That would be ideal.)
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Whose tank?
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Cool. How well do they work?
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Remember, unlike a gunsafe, a quonset hut will become an oven when put to a flame. Yes, the hut itself will resist the flame but everything inside will *bake*. A concrete block walled house with a precast concrete flat roof won't do that. Instead of concrete block you can use tilt-up concrete panels and eliminate some construction time. Thats how many of the big guys do it.
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They go up pretty fast and come in kit form. I helped build one on Useppa right before I moved from FL. The arcs were 2' wide and came in 3 parts to make a 24' dia half circle. You lay the 3 pieces on the ground and bolt them together. They were heavy gauge corrugated galvanized steel. Then you stand them up with a forklift and bolt them to the previous one thats already standing. The first one has to be anchored while building the 2nd one. After 4 arcs they stand up on their own. This one sat on top of a 4' high concrete kneewall along the perimeter. It was 40' long and took about 3 hours to build, not including the endwalls. The 4' kneewalls helped eliminate some of the *difficult to use* space along the sides inside. Not sure how you'd finish the interior for living area, maybe some of that freeky spray on insulation about 6" thick to give it that intergalactic moon look? While the insulation is still wet you can pull a trowel off of it all over the place and create some cool but dangerous stalagtites......big sharks teefs.....
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Straw bales, as well as much of this other eco-friendly nonsense is NOT lead bearing. They must either be, 1) enhanced greatly at great expense, or 2) used as filler material. The stuff I've looked at, over a multi-decades period, is always filler. I'm delving into decorative concrete and corn cobs, sawdust, ground up packing styrofoam, etc., is used as filler material, along with portland, sand, etc. to create a light weight concrete mix. Straw or hay is prganic and thus will deteriorate over time unless properly treated, not to mention the attraction of bugs and all sorts of other vermin. And don't forget the process by which the bales themselves are created, which is not the sanest method - all sorts of nasty shit gets bailed up in them things, dead animals, poisons, fertilizers, etc. All in all I don't see an advantage with the stuff and finally they are square footage intensive and very heavy, around 60-80 lbs each. Try to stack some up to wall height sometime, I dare ya! LOL
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wrote:

It depends when/where/how I think, but it has ostensibly been used as such. Doubtful, but maybe part of the load in some of that context is borne by some kinds of plaster as well (and maybe the plumbing too-- haha just kidding). My attitude/approach to it would unlikely be load-bearing anyway as I'm still on timberframepostandbeam(tm). I checked the straw bale construction Wikipedia entry, btw. Apparently it's an American invention. Good for you. Something to be proud of in a world of diminishing returns, if I use the term correctly.

I think so. I suppose, like timberframepostandbeam or any other natural/green building, expense is relative and arguable. If we agree that we're going rural, then my farming friend just next door with a houseload of lovely leftover straw versus Faceless Overseas Inc., with some weird plastic pumped stuff, guess who's going to get my business?

Tough crowd. (|:) (hard hat)
Well then how do they do it? There *is* straw bale architecture out there, and very nice examples too. Architecture can be made out of practically anything it seems, including Chinese drywall. Give me a dead earwig or fly in among the fibres filling my Truth Window over that or asbestos anyday.
I do notice the folks in the YouTube vids struggling with the bales :) but so what. I'm becoming well-aware that natural building is not as relatively easy to build as, say, stick-frame, but I doubt that's its point, or maybe it kind of is in a way, insomuch as "what you input here might save you somewhere out there" and vice-versa-- cost-benefit analyses, but *real* C-B A, not Synthetic Dreamhomes Inc.'s greenwash kind.
No one told me that mixing manure, urine, blood, "cereal leftovers" and/or mud in with the homes we might live in (and might have lived in elsewhere in aeons past) would be part of it, and possibly one of the healthiest ways to build. Regarding most of your fair points, here's a rep sample (strawbale . com) from a few quick digs: "I get a lot of questions about bugs and mice in bale walls. I understand... the image of a stack of bales in a barn usually conjurs images of a few mice and a handful of bugs; however, bales in a wall are very different than bales in a barn. The biggest difference is that the walls are covered in plaster and stacked very tightly. The plaster is the first line of defense against pests. The thickness of the plaster makes it very hard for mice and bugs to get in. If they were to get in, they would have a hard time negotiating the tight bale network. A loose stack of straw allows for bugs and mice to move freely while the densely stacked walls resist the movement of such pests... Termites and other bugs do not go after the straw. It is a waste product with no real food value for the termites."
I have also read counters that suggest that your standard stick-frame leaves far more room for pest-negotiation. I have also read that cob, for example, if recalled, due again to thick and well-sealed-yet- breathable plasters, are superior in preventing pests. Good against fires too, and when they (natural buildings) do manage to burn, they might do so relatively toxicity-free. So if you were too late in putting it out, you could at least toast marshmallows while you watch it burn down. And build again. Locally. With people you know.
Regarding your mix, how about straightup concrete/synth-free? You might have the right local ingredients right under your feet. I read something about concrete fly-ash and radon gas. Generally, much in the way of the toxic is of course very low in natural buildings.
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