Pretty nifty pictures of a 13 story Chinese building that sat down

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Seρior Popcorn-Coconut> wrote:

You're reaching into an area that has been very seldom broached in public. There is no ideal home and I know this for a fact now. In 2002 I designed and built my ideal home but once I started living in it I realized it wasn't ideal. Not just one thing was wrong with it but many, and of course at that stage of the game it was too late to fix them. My wife said I am never satisfied and she's right. You could design your dream home and build it but you too will change, like I did, and your dreamhome will not be that anymore. It might take you longer than it did for me but it will happen. For me it happened kinda fast cause by the time my house was ready to move in I had already become educated, by designing homes for other people in the interim - and learning about things, that my home seemed somewhat outdated and inefficent - I had quite naturally, changed. sigh
An ideal home can only exist in the mind of the beholder for a brief period of time and as the world turns so do the ideas and thoughts in a persons mind and they will long for something more adaptable to what they want, now, not yesterday.
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My second sentence subtly supported in principle your teardrop piles.

Long soapy mop and squeegee, like how they do it with the commercial buildings. Pussywork Inc..

Dumbwaiter and/or handicap lift or exercise if you can hack it.

Open the "fucken" windows! ;)
The ground floor could become a periodic boathouse too... if it's deep enough, you could dive in from 2nd or 3rd floors... Ah, tradeoffs, and the importance of building for the location...
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The lifelong allure of an interior stairway wore off in about 15 minutes for me. Now, I come down in the morning (the master bedroom is on the 2nd floor) and don't go back up til its time to go horizontal, with rare exceptions. You should put a railing all around the edge of your roof and turn it into a deck, or as I called it on the island homes I designed, a "Sky Deck". Course, you'll need a lapyre stair to access it. The 2nd floor deck I built 2 summers ago is about 18' off the ground at the rear of the house and we sit out there frequently in the evenings and sip some cheapassed wine and chat.
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wrote:

Here's the ACAD file (saved using 2010): http://web.ncf.ca/fr714/house3.dwg (The file has some leftover layer cruft from some online imports.)
I've considered moving the stairs to one side and might still, and also might prefer the idea of an independed apartment upstairs with an outside access stairway without an interior stairs at all.
Depends on a few things. As it stands now, I have an idea for a kind of bed built-in under the stairs on the living room side, with maybe a 3-feet-wide closet under the stairs on the kitchen side. each square of the grid is a foot, so it's quite a small house. The posts are supposed to be on the interior and mostly viewable, with about 6" of space between the perimeter interior walls and the posts.
I'm on another network that's shutting down so I'll get back to this later.

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Said: Drawing file not valid. Wouldn't open. Tried in 2004 and 2006. Our house has a 4' wide stairway right in the middle going from front to back and I Don't like it. The house is 28' wide so minus wall thickness and the stairs themselves leaves 11'-4" of actual room width on either side and thats too narrow for a master bedroom and a living room. Our living room in on the right side so it measures 11'-4" wide x 27'-4" deep and our master measures 11'-4" wide and 17' deep. I like the idea of the symmetry of a center stair but the width of the building must be commensurate. Our crib should be 30' or 32' wide to make the rooms more comfortable. I believe this house was built from a set of online stock plans - there's lots of clues.
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wrote:

ca> wrote:

This was saved as a 2004 version: http://web.ncf.ca/fr714/hous2004.dwg
There's some floor plan, but also some 3D. The washing machine is ground level.

So it's a new house? The center stairs on my design looked like a nice idea at the start, but I might move it over the couch and just have an open plan kitchen/ living room with a built in bed or something under the stairs. In fact, that should be better to fix the upstairs apartment-loft mess. It used to be a saltbox roof, but now it's a shed because I might be able to stick a tiny third floor loft in, maybe with a balcony.
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o.ca> wrote:

No, it was 7 years old when we moved in 3 years ago. I don't know what to say about the shingles that were installed but already they need to be replaced. Twice a year, when I clean the gutters, I scoop out at least a gallon of the agregate that was washed off of them. Now they're hard and brittle and lacking.

Do this: Draw a stick figure of yourself standing up, then place it in various locations throughout the space to analyze how big everything is. The thing is 16' wide and has a stair going up the middle leaving about 6' of space on either side. How important is it to have a fulltime set of stairs in such a small space? If it were me I'd label the plan so that the 2nd floor was simply storage or attic space and leave the stairs off, then after the CO was issued I'd build a method to access the 2nd floor, ladder, lapyre or my legendary *screw elevator*. **Imagine a large vertical bolt in the floor, maybe 4" in dia, that spins slowly while a single stair tread raises and lowers on the shaft while you stand on it. The other end of the stair tread fits into a vertical rail mounted to the wall to keep it from rotating with the shaft. Or, the old counterbalance weight on a rope and pulley. As far as plumbing on the 2nd floor, on the permit drawing drawings show stubouts for future bathroom and leave it at that, same with the electrical. You have to find ways to get around the ever expanding range of gov't obstacles on your way to achieving your goal.
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hoo.ca> wrote:

Potatohead or whatever is fine, I was just having some fun.
I'm inclined to agree with TCO about the stairs/upstairs/washroom, and think his corkscrew elevator is cool. I'll have to look up 'stubouts' and how I would then show the upstairs for the CO. Lots to learn.
It has definitely been hard to get an idea of the spacial proportions, even as a 3D, without actually having some kind of immersive system that puts you more in the model. That's partly why I've added the furniture, but the stick-figs are a good idea and I'd downloaded some free 3D human models to add for that until I got sidetracked with problems with my Linux/Windows partitions last winter.

What upper floor? You mean a later add-on, and like those old European houses, where the upstairs is bigger and overhangs?

A couple with guest and/or rental-space. I think I mentioned that the design, while of a different shape, seems to be about the same ground floor square footage as yours. Perhaps there's something about that size that might be "ideal" if there's such a thing, or conforms to some kind of intuitve/subconscious sense of human scale. Given its narrow size, btw, I felt that some (if not too much) ceiling height was important. Cathedral heights all over can sometimes, and ironically, make an otherwise small space feel a bit claustrophobic. It is expected that the ground floor is to have lots of windows and maybe a rolling barn-type windowed doors on one or even both sides.
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Yes but it's also cool. You want to be careful about your thingy-bingy going nude up one. That's what an ex called it-- thingy-bingy. Gay if you ask me. Imagine one shaped like a corkscrew. Now That, would be a thingy-bingy.
I Googled corkscrew elevator and recall only finding its existence in a videogame.

So what else is new? He should be careful where he points that.

Fun to watch and laugh out loud at, though, while pointing towards you two. Try a couch next time and videotape it for You Tube.
Spiral staircases don't really seem to save all that much room either, because built-unders seem difficult to do right. On the second floor, if it's kind of an open "cathedral" plan you could always use a winch/ hoist for big and heavy stuff.

That's the idea. Good show ol' boy.

Good idea/height, even if for shorter occupants, but we can't keep getting taller and taller as a species forever can we?
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"Ken S. Tucker"> wrote:

Ah, go on. Why stifle the child? We had one when I was a wee brat, for brining firewood up from the basement, right next to the fireplace in the living room and us kids used to ride in it all the time. It was a manual one, had a handcrank and I suppose some pulleys and chains, and it was common practice for one of us to get abandoned in the thing between floors. You don't grow balls until you've rode the tricycle down the basement stairs. LOL
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Yeah, I like the way it was such an orderly catastrophe.
The campanile in Venice "sat down" in 1902. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mark%27s_Campanile#Collapse_and_rebuilding
I was there last November and they are doing a lot of foundation work - seems there were some cracks...
R
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Think anybody'll move into the other buildings?
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wrote:

One word: Marketing. ;) (How well do the Chinese know about it though?)
In any case, it doesn't work for everyone.
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I'm an expert on pilings and those in the pik were now where near long enough or big enough in diameter. Hell, I used bigger stuff on my 40' deck I just built. LOL
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On Fri, 3 Jul 2009 16:19:58 -0700 (PDT), Seρior Popcorn-Coconut

How much you wanna bet, the tenants will never hear about the building problems? The oppressive government on whatever media they have and the habitual lying built into the culture will ensure that they won't know what happened until another building falls.
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Where are you that people don't gossip? Of course they'll know. The question is whether they will have any say in whether they are selected to live in the still-standing buildings or not. I'm guessing or not.
R
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