Potty Parity

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The term used on the websites is a laquer finish.

Notice that when you read the data sheets, the items listed are approved for use as coatings on paper containers and as the gasket on cans. Not the lining on the can, just the gasket area where the lid is seamed onto the can.
The pallets and boxes were labelled "enamel" and we had to make certain that the lids and cans were of the same coating. I also had to work with the quality control department to make sure that the stamped codes on the cans were not cutting through or cracking the coating on the inside of the lids.
http://www.steeluniversity.org/content/html/eng/default.asp?catid#5 &pag eid 81272441
Lacquering
This is the application of an organic coating to create a barrier between the steel and its contents (filling) and the external environment (atmosphere). The flexibility of the exterior coating depends on the type of can or component being manufactured. The interior coating depends on the kind of product and processing environment. This will influence the thickness of the coating too. Tinplate food and beverage cans are internally lacquered to prevent chemical action between the filling and the can wall and to prevent metal dissolution into the filling. For dry contents (interior) and the exterior of cans, tinplate provides sufficient protection and does not need lacquering. For white fruits and sometimes tomato based fillings the can walls are unlacquered to allow low level tin dissolution which preserves the original color of the filling.
http://www.cancentral.com/hist_timeline.cfm 1921 Zinc oxide and other zinc compounds in an enamel lining were found to prevent discoloration of canned corn by "corn black" or zinc sulphide.
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wrote:

To quote Ronald Reagan, "There you go again!" Loose verbiage.
Lacquer, from Wiki: "The term lacquer originates from the Portuguese word for lac, a type of resin excreted from certain insects.[1] Regardless, in modern usage, lac-based varnishes are referred to as shellac, while lacquer refers to other polymers dissolved in volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as nitrocellulose, and later acrylic compounds dissolved in lacquer thinner, a mixture of several solvents typically containing butyl acetate and xylene or toluene."
Please note "other polymers" and acrylic. The lining of cans is plastic. Just deal with it.
R
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If you apply direct flame to a can lid the coating bubbles like a plastic product. Smokes like a petroleum product. Regardless, the stuff leaches into the food and no good can come from it. I've tried the good stuff (Del Monte) and the store brand and it looks like all cans are lined these days. Further, you dump the contents in a tupperware and then throw it in the microwave and 3 minutes later you have a DNA altering supper. Nevermind the product itself is injected with soy derivatives, fructose and an endless stream of chemicals, coloring, flavoring, preservatives, etc. Veritable accumulative timebombs. Recently I read that your skin is the largest organ and a major exposure to unnecessary chemicals comes during your daily shower and the things you apply to yourself, shampoos, conditioners, body washes, etc. as well as the stuff in the water itself. I've eliminated most of that stuff and currently wash everything with Ivory bar soap until I can get a handle on making my own soap from natural stuff, but it looks like a major pain to do that. We have a whole house RO and a 3 stage filtration system, but we are connected to the county water and I've heard all kinds of horror stories about that stuff - that no filtration system can deal with - discarded medicines, urine estrogen, etc. Its like an onion, the more you peel away the more you find.
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wrote:

In no particular order: - RO does filter out everything you need be concerned about - essentially everything is filtered out. - try Dr. Bonner's soap - there is no such thing as a complete polymerization - there are always monomers left over. All monomers are carcinogens (then again, life is a carcinogen - no dead animals get cancer) - the stuff you apply in a shower isn't a big deal unless you don't wash it out/off - there are no guarantees in life. Deal with the bigger stuff, and don't sweat the small stuff. That will keep you alive and healthy longer than obsessing over health.
R
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Well that's good to know about the cans because I was concerned about leaving some canned opened apple juice in the fridge and a little metal leaching out. I swear by glass. Pop tarts... ah yes, you put those in the toaster and get them all nice warm and toasty, and then savour them when they pop out. If you want to send over a hacksaw to Ottawa that will be fine.
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For me, that is big stuff. Life in the woods....
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Life on planet earth: nobody gets out alive. Keep yer eye on your mailbox.
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Last night I made a load of my legendary apple crisp with a big can of sliced apples, generic store brand. The inside of the can appeared to NOT be lined. Took it to the garage and put the torch to it...ta-daaaa, no lining! So some companies are still doing it the old way. Yeah, seeds is where its at for cash crops, specially if they are heirloom quality, with a proven track record. Might even set up a 'lil ol' greenhouse. Going to the PO today, have to fill out a customs form on you. 2 for ya'll and 2 for your friends/fambly.
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wrote:

We always get tomato plants coming up from last year's crop. This year we are letting them grow. We want to see that we get. There might be some interesting cross-pollinating going on.
Big problem with early blight in this area. Some people are blaming Bonny. We don't have it and are keeping our fingers crossed.
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PatM> wrote:

The plants we had last year had to go because they were where my new deck is now. However the ones we do have now, in a different location, will be left as is and maybe next year they'll resprout. We have about 40 strawberry plants that were already here when we got here and they keep providing fruit each year, but the dam raccoons get them the day before they are ready to pick. Next year I'm gonna dust them with habenaro powder early on. >:-)
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"Ken S. Tucker"> wrote:

Yeah, that stuffs horrendously dangerous. My father in law spent 80 years around those things and ya know what, they finally won. See, I told ya!
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wrote:

The door would hit my knees before my bowels.
R
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