Nimrod

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Will wrote: [..."classical" music...]

Will, that's an appalling choice!
--
Mike.



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["Followup-To:" header set to alt.usage.english.] Will wrote:

Why? Most so-labelled composers had nothing particularly to do with academies.
Try "Western art music", which is still problematic. How 'bout "music that Liebs knows from"?
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Arrgghh. This is what you get when you cross post.
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x wrote:

What's the problem? Seems somewhat interesting to me...
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Which IMO is in the top 5 most ineffably beautiful pieces of music ever written, anywhere, at any time.
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- Kris M. Krieger

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But the Lark Ascending is in a class with few others, because it must be heard played on its own instrument (violin). A piano transcription would be almost no good at all, whereas piano transcriptions of lots of orchestral music sound just fine. (By contrast, Debussy's Cathedrale Engloutie would sound awful played on a violin.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Thu, 26 May 2005 17:35:41 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

Violin? Oh, I guess you're not talking about the Fairport Connection recording of "The Lark in the Morning". I prefer it to the Steeleye Span version.
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Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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So...? I don't mean that sarcastically, I just mean that I don't understand how that's relevant.
When I write music, I seldom just hear notes in my head, I hear timbres, "colors". Real composers typically write pieces for specific instruments. Now, some instruments share certain sound characteristics - the violin, the oboe, and the human voice, for example, sometimes sound very much alike. So music transcribed from one to the other has some chance of sounding right. With the "Lark" piece, it isn't just the notes that count, it's their *quality*. Much, and maybe even most, music is like that.
The piano OTOH doesn't sound at all like any of those, so playing the "Lark" on the piano would be silly - you cannot achieve the same, what,. feel/quality/color/timbre, you can't draw out the sound withthe same control. OTOH, piano and guitar (classical) share enough characteristics such that piano pieces can often "sound right" if played on the guitar. The reverse is not necessarily true, tho', because the guitar is of course more responsive to touch, and to where the string is plucked.
IOW, a piece of music is more than just a collection of notes. Imagine "Purple Haze" played by a marching bagpipe band...
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- Kris M. Krieger

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Don wrote:

more so in classical guitar because you are 'plucking' the melodies rather than strumming. I still sounds funny, I thought you picked a guitar and plucked a chicken.

I've never heard of this thing. Is Ebo a brand, or a type of device. Does it work on a simiar principle to vibrato/tremolo? I can get some similar sounds by combining some effects like harmonizers, chorus, and some guitar synth stuff. Pretty cool sounding, but I wouldn't necessarily use it a whole lot.
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Except that "guitar picking" is (again, *assuming* I remember correctly!) actually a combination technique/musical style that can be as simple as a pattern of playing the notes of a chord or as elaborate as (argh, there goes my memory out the window, I'm trying to think fo some artists) I want to say Ottmar Liebert, which might be wrong - at any rate, it can be aselaborate as classical guitar but the technique (I think - not sure so check me) is different and the musical style is different but the two can overlap.
At least, that'swhat I seem to recall - which may or may not be correct...
- K.

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- Kris M. Krieger

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Probably like hearing a marching band play "Iron Man", which I heard on TV last fall during a halftime show. Pretty funny when it's WAY out of context like that. Remind me to call my bagpipe playing friend, I'd kind of like to hear a little Jimi done Highland style ;-)
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You have my sympathies <g>!

Depending upon one's mood, I guess it could be really funny :)
Which is not to insult the bagpipes; I actually like thetraditional bagpipe music and imagine it'd be haunting if you heard someone playing one of the many haunting, plaintive melodies from a craggy mountainside. I actually wrote a piece for my sister that is for bagpipe and drum =:-o
But Jimi on the bagpipe... "the mind reels as reality warps and melts into into a gellid puddle of steaming green goo..."
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- Kris M. Krieger

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You could do that! Just remember to post the MP3!
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- Kris M. Krieger

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Um, er, strummed...?
I only use "plucked" ebcause I think (assuming I remember correctly) (correct me please if I'm incorrect) that in musicology, guitar, mandolin, harp, lute, mandolin etc. (and I thin the harpsichord...?) are referred to as "plucked string instruments", as opposed to violin, viola, cello, etc. which are "bowed string instruments", and things like piano which I thik are called "hammered string instruments".
No insult intended ;) !

You should post some mp3 files.
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- Kris M. Krieger

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I can't tell - I have a dialup so the page is loading at the speed of a herd of turtles, plus I don't get multimedia through the internet (turned it off because of slowload time - takes up to 15 min for multimedia stuff to load).
"The Lark Ascending" is a piece for orchestra and violin by Ralph Vaugh WIlliams (the last name might be hyphenated...), a composer from Britian who wrote in what I think is called "the pastoral style". He used a lot of folk music melodies and themes from the British Isles. I only knowa few of his works, I just relaly like the "Lark" piece.
What I really wish is that I was able to transcribe my experience of it into a 3D model, but the shapes are too complex and I don't have sufficient talent :(
HTH
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- Kris M. Krieger

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Robert Lieblich spake thusly:

Oooh, no, I don't agree. Pomp & Circumstance marches appeal to the British part of me. The English part responds to Enigma, the cello concerto and Gerontius. As well as Tallis, Vaughan Williams and Britten.
--
David
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Robert Lieblich wrote:

Sure
http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/amiciforever/nimrodluxaeterna.html
Lux aeterna luceat eis Domine cum sanctis tuis in aeternum: quia pius es. Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine; et lux perpetua luceat eis. Cum sanctis tuis in aeternum quia pius es.
--
John Dean
Oxford
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John Dean spake thusly:

I'm not sure that these words can be said to have been "written". I suppose somebody wrote them originally, but they've been in use for many hundreds of years.
"set" is probably the word.
--
David
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Cross-posted to alt.usage.english for some help. One hopes.
On 05 May 2005, Kris Krieger wrote (in alt.architecture)

I've only recently encountered "nimrod" as a term of abuse, and had precisely the same reaction.
I've done a google and a search in alt.usage.english, but as neither of these turned anything up, I'm cross-posting this in the hope that someone (hiya, Donna!) might help.
--
Cheers, Harvey
Architectural and topographical historian
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It just sounds bad to be called a nimrod. It's like Tookie, Charle Amirault was sent to prison in the Fells Acres child molestation case more on his nickname "Tookie" than on any evedidence the State had. Some names and words just sound bad.
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