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I'm in the process of reducing a window size to minimal size for a bedroom. The old UBC exit facilities sec 1404 requirements was 5.7 sq ft min 24" ht 20" wide 44" max from floor
Has that changed since the late 70s? I want to use an aluminum 36" hi X 48" wide horizontal slider. Would that typically comply?
Thanks
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wrote:

Thanks, I would but I was hoping to do it today Sunday. I'm in LA County CA Not even sure the UBC goes by that name any more.
or check with the manufacturer.

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California uses the UBC 97 code and edited to the CA 2000 building code. Hope this helps. Better hurry they might change to the IBC shortly.

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FYI These are the correct current requirements. Per the plan chucker.
On Sat, 15 Dec 2007 18:29:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nosam.org wrote:

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On Dec 17, 12:25 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nosam.org wrote:

a). Don't top post b). Don't top post when you're quoting more than one person and there's assorted information in the various quotes. c). Don't top post when you're saying "these are the correct current requirements" when it's not clear due to b) what you are referring to. d). If you're referring to your original post dimensions, and the plans examiner is agreeing that they are sufficient, he's wrong. e) If the plans examiner is wrong, approves your drawings, you build it, the building inspector fails it, you won't be able to say, " But he _said_ it was okay!" You can't violate code because someone made a mistake. f) Don't top post.
R
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I can't believe this post, if you look close to what he says about the window size in the UBC and what he desires. 3X4 feet. This is 12 sq ft area. This is greater then 5.7 Sq ft. The 24" high and 20" wide minimum is only 3.33 sq ft.
To verify look at the IBC 2006 plus your area ( or outside of US ) edited version of same. You can also look at the IBC 2006 Residential Code.
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But you can't use *both* minimums at the same time. If the opening is 24" high, the width needs to be about 35". If the width is 20", the height needs to be 57".
--
Dennis


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You're reading the code incorrectly. It doesn't matter how damn big the window is, it matters how big the unobstructed opening is. Things like glass and frame generally obstruct movement through a window. That's how they're designed to work.
The code is intended to allow a fire fighter - or Santa Claus, it's that time of year and the chimney route is wreaking havoc with his back - to enter through the window while in full gear with breathing backpack.
R
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lol, I've heard the "fireman in full gear" explaination too. But the code for acceptable clear opening in a window calls for "Egress", in other words, exit. That and firemen have axes and are not afraid of using them. I doubt that a fireman would even check to see if the window was locked before ripping it out for ingress.
The 4' wide window would work with 40" height (@ 5.8 s.f. opening)

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