Model Building - Roof Help!

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Michael (LS) wrote:

Depends... I know you can get a printer for about $23K, so they're not going to be THAT expensive. Just google for "rapid prototyping models" and you should get some hits that might give you an idea. I would think small and ready-to-go model would be in the hundreds.
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*or* = First Born (and NO that's not an acceptable price, second born.....sure, but NOT first born)
;- >
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1. Fire the architect. 2. http://www.howardmodels.com/Architectural-Scale-Models/index.html
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snipped-for-privacy@tampabay.rr.com wrote in

Do people go to school to do that? It looks like to could be kind of fun. And more practical than non-flying model airplanes ;)
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I have no idea. Are you're planes not meant to fly, or do you just have trouble with them? I live in a home of RC plane obsession. :)
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buy a roll of cork and use it for the contours. Basswood for everything else. Maybe cherry of the same product line.
http://www.misterart.com/store/view/003/group_id/7482/DOOLEY-Cork-Roll.htm
http://www.misterart.com/store/view/003/group_id/1449/Midwest-Balsa-Sheets.htm
If you know what you are doing, you can be very economical with how you use the supplies to keep costs down. my guess would be about $75 in supplies for what i listed above.
Nothing looks as impressive as a wood model. ;)
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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I was looking over the 3D CAD programs at CompUSA some time ago and while reading the box of one of the products I learned this vendor [1] (as I recall) has developed their software to transform the 3D CAD model to output a 2D template that can be used to build models. Like a pattern for sewing.
I also learned the vendor has a patent on this and it is damn clever if you ask me and a mystery why this type of feature is not better known. I do not know how well they have done at this and I didn't see any mention of the modeling feature at the website but if I still had to do models I would be looking into something like this. If its not Punch Software that has this feature a visit to a CompUSA to read the back of the boxes of the 3D CAD programs should turn something up.
<%= Clinton Gallagher NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher /
[1] http://www.punchsoftware.com/index.htm
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I have the prog. from Punch!, it supposedly does that but I never tried that function. You can supposedly inport your own texture files, and have the prog. print out color forms that you can then glue to board and cut out.
Also, one can convert a 3D model's parts by exporting the OBJs to Pepakura and print to cover stock for cutout and assembly. But it's limited as to the number of polygons it can convert to assemble-able format. It doesn't seem to handle more than the simplest curves :( ((I was hoping to use ti to convert curved 3D objects that I could then use as patterns for armatures for clay or concrete stuff - currently trying to think up a way around that but that's another saga...))

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Kris Krieger wrote:

We're trying to come up with "patterns" for the roof pieces from a 2D roof drawing.

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Without replying to each individual post, let me say THANKS for all the helpful comments regarding model building. We started playing around with our next model yesterday. The house is awful, but the client LOVES it. We don't think it has a chance of passing the review, so alas, we will be back to the drawing board. Such is the nature of working with clients with more money than taste, but it's part of what keeps us in business in this area. :) We don't have the luxury of turning down business from people whose vision may not match up with what we consider to be a great looking design.
Regarding the comments that we outsource, we got quotes for the last model and the builder would not pay for it. He prefers our models for the price, which is why we want to get as efficient with them as possible. :-)
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Actually, what your doing is fine for a subdivision approval. You want to have nice models for show and tell at your business, but in this part of Texas (central) you not likely to convince the owner/builder to pay for a "good" model. Has the project gone to cad yet? Visually, simply plotting paper with roof hatch on it then cutting it will add more detail.
You said your a small firm....we are too, and we simply can't afford the manpower and programs to produce great models. In the rare instance we get clients who want models, we sub them out. If your doing lots of homes in this area, this could be the most profitable for you. Striking an agreement with a reputable model builder will save everyone time and money. Model builders can be very reasonable in cost if they have the potential for many projects or similar scope. If you need a recommendation for one in Central Texas, I'll add a link (otherwise, I won't Spam the group)
Do they HAVE to be physical? Sketch-Up has a very short learning curve from which you can create great models for this purpose. The program is not expensive (around 500 I think).
Good luck with...I personally would love to see your progress.. jojo
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jojo wrote:

A SketchUp model is far better in my mind. Lots more detail, can show the actual shadows cast for the actual location and time of day/year, and it can be output as a video. It might be worth taking a CD to the development board meeting and see what they think.
R
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Yes, the whole thing has been blocked out as part of the package we had to submit. Frankly, I think the review process is a bit ridiculous, but the community is so super exclusive.

That's what we did, minus the hatching. We actually don't know how to do a roof on a model, and that is mostly the problem. Part of the reason that roof looks so crappy (opinions on complexity aside) is that piecing it together was pure guesswork on our part!
As far as the review process goes, we do not have to resubmit a model, so ours made it through just fine. We did have to make a few adjustments to the elevations and floor plants, and add more detail to our plans, but you're right, our model worked fine for the review. We would just prefer to have a better idea of what we are doing!

Yep, they HAVE to be physical...a bit ridiculous right? To me, they seem to want us to jump through hoops more than provide them with stuff that's actually helpful.

I appreciate it!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

3D LCD shutter glasses may be another, more effective (in terms of cost, labor, and resources) option: http://www.reald.com/scientific/products.asp
Rather than output anything, just input the clients. :)
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