KP2009MAY16 SUBS#19: MOLD MANIA!

KP2009MAY16 SUBS#19: MOLD MANIA!
I keep thinking about molds and my ideal scene to make SUBS.
Take a five by nine foot 1" steel plate you commonly see covering street trenchs for cars to drive over. Weld crane hooks in the corners. That's half your mold.
Now place a [4'x8'x6"] wood subs panel face down in the middle of the steel plate, so the framing is up, leaving 6" around it for the mold.
Now cover the whole steel panel one foot deep in Magic Compound X.
You'll need to cast slots 6" deep at the ends and middles to put your HDPE #2 plastic milk jugs in. But you also need big strong bridges to hold the central mold boxes.
You can use sections of flat steel ventilation duct to make the feed slots. Just place them over the long framing members at ends and centers. [9 slots.] Cover everything else a foot deep in Magic Compound!
If you have Magic Compound CLAY, you just turn your propane heater on full blast to fire the clay red hot, and burn the wood right out of the mold. Rinse out any carbon with a hose. You can place wire mesh in the clay to make super- strong steel-reinforced ceramic molds, with pump-jack stirrups over the feed-slots, so you're all set to push the plastic panels out of the mold. Cool it down slow and you're ready to go!
If you have Magic Compound CONCRETE, you can still use wire mesh, but you don't even have to heat it. Just wait. A month. Oil the wood really good!. If the pump jacks get the wood out, they will do plastic EZ!
If you have Magic Compound HIGH TEMPERATURE SILICONE RUBBER you can cure it either by heating, or by mixing in the acivator just before molding. [There are various kinds of silicone rubber.] But you probably won't need jack mounts to pry the panel out, because the mold is slightly flexible, like a car tire, so you can pry the mold off the panel with a bar. Rubber is much lighter than concrete or ceramic! No need for wire mesh either!
Because the mold sides are 6" wide, they will be very resistant to deformation. We can get a good casting without an absolutely rigid mold: a big plus! The steel plate will keep it flat!
Whatever your favorite Magic Compound, just heat the steel plate with a home- made copper tubing propane burner.
Don't even bother trying to heat the top side of the mold. Heat rises. Just shove those milk jugs in the slots. This time you KNOW there's a payoff coming!
When liquid plastic reaches the "full" mark inside the fill-chutes, STOP!
Cool off with water and pry the mold off.
YOU'RE DONE!
Ain't that convenient!
A turd-world panel factory that produces slick high tech structures from useless crap found free in dumps, and mined free with nets for hundreds of miles at sea in the dead zones!
NO ELECTRICITY REQUIRED!
Ain't that convenient!
Also, I finally figured out that to shoot panels temporarily together, you DON'T need duplex nails, which stand up about 1/2", because you can simply fire single head twist-shank square nails 1/4" or even 3/8" high. That's plenty to grag with a bar to pull!
DUH! I forgot there's an adjustment for that on my beloved nail gun, because I always shot flush. Square shank twists don't even need their heads to hold, which you can leave sticking out to pull.
Shoot wood or plastic just the same!
EASIER! CHEAPER! BETTER! WITH NO SPECIAL TOOLS!
Ain't that convenient!
You can even re-use the nails when you put the panels up again, if you want to hand nail them.
Or sell them to someone who does! 20% off for used- once straights!
When you are not using the steel plate for casting SUBS panels, you can play ping-pong on the back! Just mark the lines with tape and clamp on a net!
Ain't that convenient!
GOOD2GO!
O --- ) \\
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plastic has issues, a mix of scrap plastics has many more issues.
I used hundred or so 10'x 5' x 3/8" thick clear UV stopping clear yellow panes to build a good sized see through electronics research lab in 1989 or so... the pieces framed in steel held their shape, the ceiling pieces held less frirmly expanded about 2" each in length when the high intensity lighting came on. you can look up the coefficient of expansion for various plastics on the web.
a mix of plastics at random would have a range of other issues, random expansion within a panel along with variable strength and rigidity profiles... solutions would involve a floating foundation for example.
A friend of mine did a 400' long refrigerated ship in alaska once. steel bulkheads port to starboard, welded when he fired off the refrigeration, as the holds go below zero, the bulkheads shrank about an inch, cracking the hull top to bottom, the ship sank in about a minute and a half, as the investors were standing on the dock drinking martini's and eating sushi... only the ships radio antenna remained above water.
the plastic house would a lot more expansion than that, but a lot less damage done when it happened.
Concrete on the other hand has a much lower coefficient of expansion... usuall the joints between panels can be tar or a flex compound that prevents problems.
Phil scott
Phil Scott.
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