Is there a concrete block wall inside this stone wall?

This property has a stone wall on the exterior:
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-10/1090906/stonewalloutside.JPG
and also on the interior:
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-10/1090906/stonewallinside.JPG
is it possible the entire wall is made of stone, or could there be a concrete wall in the middle and the stones are just decorative? How would I find out?
No plans of any kind available.
Thanks,
MC
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I used to live in Miami and at one time cement stone veneer it was the thing. I know, my father did it to our house. It is nothing more than cement veneer colored and formed to mimic stone. The wall is more than likely concrete block with the imitation stone veneer. Again you will have to go through the process to find out from the building department if they have plans or other records of the house. You will have to do this every time unless you know a previous owner who knows the house history.
CID...
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Thanks. How are cement stone veneer made?
If so can I chip them out and expose the concrete wall inside? I don't mind the stone look on the outside but I don't like it on the inside.
MC

would
have
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miamicuse wrote:

That's too bad because it is a very carefully fitted stone wall. Kind of like saying, I don't like all of that mahogany raised paneling in the library, can I rip it out and put up drywall?
R
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Er, you have crossed over into the vasat region known as "Kris' area of ignorance". Dunno what you mean.
But, if the wall is already rock'n'concrete, would there be outlets in it....? I don't recall the he mentioned any.
The idea of a "false wall" is prob the best, since it *would* allow for wiring and so on. I just figured that plastering it over was might be a 'quick'n'dirty" solution.
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One would think - but there are many stange and silly things that get done...
I also like the "false wall" idea, tho', becuase in addition ot putting in outlets if need be, you could insulate behind it. In warm climates, I don't think stone/concrete is bad, but in cold climates, they can bring a lot of cold into the living area. Same with exposed brick.
((Log houses are not the same because wood itself has insulating properties, but I've forgotten the exact figures - I seem to recall something to the effect of a sheet of exterior plywood having a rating of 2 or thereabouts, but I can't remember.))

Oh, I get it, because drywall compound is called "mud" - thanks :)
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message

2
There are outlets on the wall. By the way I spoke to the original architect who designed this house for himself in the early 70s, he said he thinks it is a concrete block wall inside.
MC
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"miamicuse"

Is there an access hole anywhere around or above it? I suppose you could non-destructively or repairably drill one or pry something open to see. You could also approach some kind of tradesperson, builder or architect, or their associations and schools about it. They might know or tell you how to find out.

How about the local univ's geology or mining department, then, or using some kind of "tomograph" or drilling a core sample? ;)
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If the stones are laid sideways it's a stone veneer. Stone used in walls relies on the stones acting in compression. Most stone is 2 directional meaning that it can only handle compression in one axis. Some common stone is 4 directional like ignious rock (granite, marble etc) and some sedimentary stone (sandstone) meaning that it can handle compresion in two axis or directions .
These look like field stone of some sort which is 2 directional. For fieldstone (like shale or slate) to be used in stone walls, they'd need to be laid flat on top of each other so as to be in compression. If 2 direction stone were used in the wrong direction, it would crumble and delaminate from itself in no time. When you see stones like these used in the vertical direction you must can usually safely assume that it's stone veneer.
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Pierre Levesque, AIA wrote:

"..you must can usually safely assume..." Hoo boy, I think I need a few to catch up with you and decipher that! ;)
Veneer can be added to a wall, or the veneer can be the outer skin of a poured wall. Can't tell without poking a hole or three.
R
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That's wachu git for skippin' all those Geology 101 classes! LOL!
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miamicuse wrote:

Stone veneer was very common in the late 60s/early 70s, at least in south Florida. The stone could be either entirely fake (composed of plaster), or actual stone pieces cemented to wire lathe on CMU wall. Without plans, the only way to find out is to try and remove a piece, or core drill from the inside with a sizeable bit. That way you will discover if the stone is on lathe or directly cemented on the CMU. Either way, it will be labor intensive to remove.
Marcello
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Looking at the way the sone is shaped and oriented, my guess would be concrete core. Doesn't have the "feel" of the (few) solid stone walls I've seen - the stones don't look like they're supporting one another, they look more like they're stuck on.
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