Interior design fees

Hi all- not sure if there are any interior designers on this group, but maybe the construction folks could help me out too? I am trying to gather some information on what interior designers charge for hourly work & how they calculate the # of hours worked. I am fresh out of interior design grad school and am not sure if I should adjust down my hourly rate or bill based on 3/4 of hours worked, etc. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks! Char
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CLLB wrote:

It depends partly on what kind of education, background and certification you have, but basically, you charge what the market will bear minus any competitive edge you need to help getting started. I am surprised you aren't chosing to work for someone else for at least a year or so, until certification at least. One thing I think is appropriate is not to charge for learning on the job. Thus, if you have to spend a lot of time on a job researching one aspect or another, say, contextual historic interiors in the specific particular locale of a job, you would not charge for your time in becoming competitive with your already up to speed competition, whether or not you already have the work, but you would charge for preparation of your design and alternatives and any change orders, field work, travelling around with the client to showrooms, and etc., assiciated with the job at hand. Usually the charge rises with the level of liability implicit in the particular piece or stage of work. An interior architect doing only DDs does not need to cover the same liability as CDs and this is less than something requiring CM or CQM.
Try to look at your fees in terms of necessary overhead and hours spent on necessary tasks and client work. Your firm will, for example, spend x number of hours going after work, x number of dollars travelling to everything from presentations to whatever and y number of dollars on furniture, equipment and etc., all of which gets expensed various ways according to the IRS and become the basis for the overhead you apply to your base rates. You can acquire a certain amount of knowledge of what junior and senior and various levels of experience and expertise by perusing open source documents for competitive bids for public projects. You can get more knowledge from associations like the AIA, APA and etc. You can get some assistance from an accountant who regularly prepares materials for firms that regularly bid out work.

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[edited for bandwidth]

I'd just add: keep in mind the idea of "theme". An English Pub style isn't necessarily the best for a sushi bar <G!> Much depends upon the expected menu, the target clientelle, and the ambiance that the owners/operators of the eatery want to evoke.

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Interior design fees are charged on Two clear basis 1. "Charge on the actual cost of the execution" This can work for most commercial and nominal projects. However, for some clients who insist on reuse of some old elements or wish to purchase part of the raw materials or supply / get executed few items through their own labour force or through their own departments >> determination of actual cost of the job is not easy and as a result the total fees (as % of actual costs) remains indeterminate. 2. "Charge on the actual VALUE accruing to the client-user out - because of the project". A wonderful or innovative idea of Interior Design scheme can make a building entity worth several times the cost of real input involved. As an experienced professional > if you can judge such a "post execution value of the project", you must charge fees on this rather than stick to formula 1 as mentioned above. 3. A safer bat most of the young (fresh) designer resort to is " Charge fees in terms of the floor area involved x cost of typical level of interior work (for the quality/ region/ complexity, etc.)" This is easy to determine and has minimum number of disputes. If you wish to delve more into this subject, you are welcome to contact me
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