Insulation - Southern Louisiana

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Any architects on this ng from southern Louisiana? Would like to discuss insulation in walls vs. attic. I suggest a 30R for attic and only 11R for walls (4"). There is a myth out there that walls need to be 6" to give southern walls adequate insulation. Crock of grits! I bump into someone who keeps this myth going every now and then (like now - client - who happens to be an engineer who thinks he knows more than God).
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Jude Alexander wrote:

First, go here: http://tinyurl.com/2hswkq . This site should settle any engineer down pretty well. If it doesn't, then I can't help.
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Thanks. The R values are close to what I suggest in my plans. Minimum R11 (I think I'll go up to the 13, however) in the wall and I'll stick with my R30 vs. R20 in my attics. This gives me something to show the guy. :)
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Jude Alexander wrote:

The Building Science guys know their stuff. They've approached it all from a physics standpoint - what really happens and how can you really build it. 99% of the time, I do what they recommend. It's really hard to go wrong with it...
Note that they recommend using rigid at the perimeter wall... Something you don't see everyday, usually.
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That's true. Usually, people use the "pink stuff" (fiberglass).

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Why is that?
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I understand now. I was just wondering what about it you didn't like.
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I have worked on a project where the owner requested "Blue Wood" for the framing. What I understand is the "blue" is a coating that preserves the wood, prevents the wood from mold and the like. It doesn't have anything to do with the insulation. If you know that felt or other building paper wasn't used over the 'blue' then it must do both, building paper and a wood preservative. I know if you search "Blue Wood" with Google's you will find out exactly was it does.
CID...
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Here is the web site for BLUWOOD:
http://www.bluwood.com /
CID...
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We have fiberglass in the framing, then 3/4" blue foam (string board at the corners) and Tyvek over that, then the brick (hardi-plank on the second storey). I'd like mroe insualtion in the attic, tho'. We have the blown- in kind but I'd like to put somnething over that, maybe the thick rigid foam.
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[ snip ]

THat's a good idea, I prob ought to check into setting something up *before* anything like that happens...

How much does it save? I mean, both up-front, *and* including what one has to gothrough to remedy all the eventual problems...?
It increasingly seems to me that most "savings", really aren't...

Those the tips re: the batting are excellent. I wouldn't have thought to do any of that. In a hot wet climate, does the paper go upwards, or does it face down (where the ceilings are)? I know I could aks the sales doodz at Home Depot or Lowe's, but I don't trust them to know...

One thing for sure, to work with fiberglass, I would get one of those disposable hooded body suits, face mask, gloves, and so on - fiberglass is great as insualtion, but it is also nasty if it gets into your skin or lungs.
Hard part will be clambering over all of the ducting - it's flexible, but it's everywhere (and I'm not as limber as I used to be, more like lumber, heh...)

Oh, yeah... smart idea!

I'm assuming I would have to get some of those styrofoam forms that you insert between the studs (of the roof) to be sure that the insualtion doesn't cover the soffets.
BTW, what do you think of putting nylon door/window screening over the soffits, on the inside, to block bees and whatnot? I don't know whether the holes (we have hardi-plank soffets) are small enough to keepout bees.
ANyhoo, thanks for the practical tips. I feel like I ought to send you something ;)
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Actually, there isn't as much cross-bracing as I'd expect - it's mostly taken up by flexible insualted ducting tubes. At least, the one (topmost) section.
I'd have to plan it pretty carefully; laying the batting under the ducting will also be a challenge. It will definitely take planning.

There is only one way into the topmost area, which is the pull-down ladder in the upstairs landing area. The area over teh garage is easy, thre is a mini-door - literally, it's framed and had a doorknob and so on. The water heater is in that area. no insulation since it's over the garage, but I'll eventually put something down so as to keep teh base- plate area of the "extra room" warmer. Right now, the room seems to me to get hotter and colder than it ought to, which I think might be affecting the master bath underneath it.
THe other side of the extra room only has some silly screw-in square of painted plywood - I'd like to eventually put a mini-door there as well, because there is potential storage space, plus I'd liek to be able to check the area periodically.

I guess I'd have to look at the blown stuff, too, and see how high it's piled up.

So it should cost about $350 (after tax) for the material itself. Not too bad, but takes planning.

I'd prob have them deliver it, actually. I can't fit too much in my little old Saturn sedan <L!> Also wouldn't want fiberglass bits left in the car.

THat's the case with most things, so makes sense.
Good idea re: the plywood. It's not a bad idea to have some on hand for generalized cutting, too.

Got those ;) I found some "heavy duty" ones at Lowe's, which are good for any'n'all projects that require kneeling. I think they're a good investment - if one has knee problems, they mitigate those, and if one does not have knee problems, it's one way to keep from getting them.

Yeah, esp. given the humidity here (Houston is the 5th most humid city in the US, IIRC).
I'm not as worried re: heat loss (it got up to 78 degrees yesterday - the A/C kicked on...), as I am with the longevity, "blowiness", and other problems with the blown-in junk.
((ALthough I do wonder whether the rising heat from the uninsulated attic rea over the garage for most of the year is part of what makes the extra room so hot - there is batting on the room's walls, buit the garage faces South, so the sun beats down on it for most of the day.))
Ideally, I'd consider boarding-over the attic, first to keep teh insulation in place and so on, second to provide a place to walk so I can periodically check through the attic. Trying to balance on the beams is really tricky for me.
All in all, tho', the main thnig is that, if I do this again (have a place built by either a developer or, *hopefully* int he future, custom), I'm definitely going to ask about options other than this blown-in crap. If it costs extra, or if I have to go buy it myself and put it in before the ducting goes in, so be it. THis blown-in stuff in IMO just something that is expedient and cheap as peanut shells for the builder, and a future big pain in the bucket for the buyer...
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Difficult to do in practice. Contractors have to take it seriously, as do you when reviewing. The gaps are what kill you. I've done it a couple of times in limited areas in reno work.
--


MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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Jude Alexander wrote:

Or, if he's not in a "flood" area, then here: http://tinyurl.com/yqm7qb .
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I know that the walls don't need 6" of insulation in southern Louisiana. This pdf gives me something to show the guy. We did all the heat gain/heat loss calucations in college with brick/stone wall, stucco wall and siding ad nausem.

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They have building codes down there? You can do r13 in 2x4s...
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Yes.
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Ditto here @ 32 degree longitude and, I think, you're around 40 degree.
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Why is more insualtion bad?
I lived in a place here (Houston area) with low insualtion, and this place (decent insulation). I could feel the heat (and January chill) through the walls in the other place, feel lots less here. Main loss ia the windows - double-paned, but the sumbass aluminum frames radiate like mad - had great ones in Canada, wish I could recall what type/brand they were (that was 1993, so I've forgotten).
Air-conditioning is a lot more expensive than heat, so it always mystifies me that people think you need less insulation in a hot (esp a hot and extremely humid) climate.
YOu might call it a myth, but personally, I'd take more/better insulation over less insulation ANY day.
I also got tech-shield and tyvek. I guess that, in your book, that makes me an even bigger idiot. I'm not an engineer and I certainly don't think I know more than God, OTOH, I *do* know what my energy bills say, or more to the point, *don't* say.
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