Fireproof Construction looks like?

Just how practical and costly would a near fireproof res. really be - compared to standard stucco and wood frame?
Did a google and found next to nothing. I'm thinking about the recent fire storms in California. Sparks and fire moves like a high wind snow storm - down, sideways and even up under anything above ground level.
First there is no such thing as fireproof - only near fireproof. Given the above conditions it would appear that the construction would need to be near air tight in order to keep out fire. Any vents or even roof tile would likely be major problems. Vents (no plastic) would need steel covers - to be manually closed prior to the event. Glass in windows or doors?? The roofing (even tiles with air gaps) would be a real problem.
Any suggestions or links (other than reinforced concrete boxes)?
m
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2007 11:40:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nosam.org wrote:

Seriously, assuming 100'-200' clearance of flammable all around (if possible) stucco on wood would work if there are NO holes or vents and a proper seal at the bottom (done how?). Most hurricane or storm shutters I have seen are far from airtight and would allow sparks and burning debris to fly right through. Roof tile would have a similar problem. There can be no exposed wood or plastic anything. Rather than a generator - have dual gas powered fire pumps from adequate water source(s). One may not start when needed. Is design not all about controlling costs while achieving goals. Others here are far smarter than me...
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Why do you say that?

This is something I've thought about, for a second or two, during a recurring reverie where I can afford wooded recreational property within a reasonable drive of my home town. I never get to far with it, since the premise is pretty far-fetched, but non-combustible construction is an obvious place to start. Fire shutters could probably handle the openings. Landscaping/siting could be part of the answer as well. More than airtightness, my limited thinking has focused on eliminating conduction through non-combustible assemblies.
Everything's harder in tighter suburban contexts where there's less maneuvering room in siting a building.
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MichaelB
www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2007 17:40:32 -0400, "Michael Bulatovich"

Because sparks the size of dust particles have been known to enter enclosed spaces. The result is often a sudden flash over/explosion from the 'inside'..

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Don't you need a pressure gradient to move them? I don't know about fire spread, but wind would seem to be all you've got, unless I'm missing something. Besides, with non-combustible construction your entire fuel supply would be limited to furnishings, no?
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snipped-for-privacy@nosam.org wrote in

It's still a hell of a lot better than the wood-frame wood-sided wood- shingle-roofed places of which I saw so very many in the expensive areas near where I used to live in SoCal several years ago.
It's onething to at elast *try* to make a place fire-resistant. It's another to build something that's basically a tinderbox, becuase it's "stylish" - and then justify it with silly arguments that "nothing is perfect". Of course nothign is perfect, but there is such a thing as taking reasonable steps to at least *try* to safeguard your home and your life.
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wrote:

You are correct.
I do not practice any more but I do feel an obligation to at least be informed - if of nothing else - at least about my own limitations and where answers can be found. Australia never entered my mind in this context before today. They clearly have a leg up on us down under.
Questions from the public never stop.
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snipped-for-privacy@nosam.org wrote in

Australians come up with a lot of unique solutions. They sort-of have to, in a way. But also, I think it's something that the place itself inspires in people. My sister moved there many years back, and it's interesting to talk to her because her thinking has changed in a number of positive ways.
I occasionally think about taking a long visit there, but I'm afraid that, if I did, I might never want to come back <g!>
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It's not really *that* much simplification - it's common sense. It's well-known that there are various things people can do to make a place more fire-resistant - if they take steps to do so, each itam accomplished should bring a corresponding reduction in fire-insurance rates. Perhaps even a tax credit, as one can get when one insulates one's attic.
If one lives in a fire-prone area and chooses to forgo fire-risk- reduction in favor of "style", it's unfair to make eveyone else bear the burden of that one person's bad choice.
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snipped-for-privacy@nosam.org wrote in

Try Google Australia eg
http://www.google.com.au/search ? hl=en&safe=off&q=protecting+houses+from+bushfire+&btnG=Search&meta=cr% 3DcountryAU
[remove line wrapping]

Correct - steel, concrete, timber houses all burn. Lightweight structural steel looses strength rapidly. Heavy timber structures have good resistance and may stay up, but the charring can't be fixed afterwards. Yes, glass is very vulnerable.

Almost impossible, and there is a massive fuel load inside the house, so hoses are needed inside as well.
Australian recommendations include blocking downpipes and filling gutters, good firebreak all round the property. But all part of a complete strategy, which includes the decision (if allowed) to stay and fight, or secure as well as possible and get out, type of clothing, vehicle movement strategies etc.
We have some remarkable success stories and many tragedies with bushfires. Firestorms are something else entirely ...
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Excellent! Had to use: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=safe+protecting%2Bhouses%2Bfrom%2Bbushfire&btnG=Search Most of us do not even have a clue as to what is involved.
Thanks m
On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 18:00:44 +0000 (UTC), Troppo

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now that's funny,...........!
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How abot quad-50cals behind break away walls - to create your own firestorm
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