Correct proportions needed

Greetings to the Group! Perhaps someone in here can assist me since Google hasn't done a terrific job so far.
I make little wood boxes. ( See www.littleboxes.eu ) I have been commisioned to make a box which is "broadly reminiscent" of Roman architecture so I am going to design a colonnade running around the entire box. The box itself will be about 10" X 4" (a necessary size - no flexibility here.)
What I need to know is the correct (most appropriate/most common) distance between columns based on their width. Is there an equation I can use, i.e. if the column is X cm wide then the on center distance between columns will be Y cm. The columns will probably be about 10 cm to 12 cm wide. I understand there may not be any hard and fast ratios applicable.
Many thanx for any assistance you can provide.
FoggyTown
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CORRECTION! That should be 10 MM to 12 MM. Sorry
FoggyTown
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Roman Orders of Architecture Doric Column Proportions Architectural Graphic Standards Fifth Edition
Base 8/6 diameter in plan, 1/2 diameter in height Shaft 1 diameter @ base, 7 diameters in height     Shaft is straight for bottom 1/3 & tabered above that
Capital 1/2 diameter in height,     Capital is composed of Astragal, Necking, Ehinus, &            Abacus Entablature rests on Capital & is composed o: Architrave 1/2 diameter in height Frieze 3/4 diameter in height Cornice 3/4 diameter in height
T
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Thank you, but what I really need is the "on center" distance between each column IF, in fact, the distance is subject to ratio guidelines.
FoggyTown
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FoggyTown wrote:

One problem with that, and why I sent you to the study, is that the columns themselves vary in thickness from slimmer at the top where they meet the capitols, whichever kind you choose, to where they meet the bases. The study Maison Carre a Nimes explains how this works. And once you uhderstand these calculations, you not only are able to design harmonius columns in all parts but can understand their relationship to the facade as a whole and why straight columns don't work. Learn once, have various calculations available and you can do this with all sorts of projects.

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FoggyTown wrote:

You can read the book, the Maison Carre at Nimes which discusses classical proportions.

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FoggyTown wrote:

FoggyTown...
Dunno, but you might strike gold if you DAGS on "acropolis restoration project".
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

I did better when I DAGS on "parthenon measurement"
http://www.metrum.org/key/athens/dimensions.htm
There was also a PBS offering titled "Secrets of the Parthenon" that talked about the ratios used in building the Parthenon and some previous temples - and it offered some interesting info on how the Athenians went about designing various curves into the structure.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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That is an EXCELLENT reference. TYVM.
FoggyTown
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Very fair point. When I refurbish the site soon I will include some of those - as long as they don't show up the filler and open joints! :)
FoggyTown
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He specified Roman.
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FoggyTown wrote:
[...]

The Parthenon and almost every Greek temple of that period was designed using hundreds of well defined ratios. The ratios in complex geometric relationships governed the spacings of every possible feature of the designs.
To find the proportions of the Parthenon and other structures conduct an Internet search with the keywords, [ Parthenon +proportions ].
There is a tremendous amount of information on the matter in printed books; and probably more than there is on the Internet. The proportional systems are lightly gone over by most students of the architecture. You would have to consult the books on the buildings by the historians of geometry and architecture to get the finer points.
On the Internet there are some possibilities:
http://www.ancient-greece.org/architecture/parthenon.html
http://www.ancient-greece.org/architecture/parthenon2.html
http://www.radzjukevich.narod.ru /
http://www.radzjukevich.narod.ru/plates.html
The measurement and proportional systems used by the architects, Iktinos and Kallikrates, were based upon the elaborate Pythagorean system of geometry. Their temples were based upon many types of mathematical principles that had been discovered in geometry. The inter-relationships of mathematical ratios are intricate and complicated.
You asked about the proportions of the columns. You can get the measurements from books, however, one obscure fact concerns the shape of the columns. The shape is an ellipsoid of rotation with the top and base made flat. With the diameters of the narrower top, widest, and bottom you could construct the shapes. Check the heights for those were in a specific ratio to the column centerline spacings.
Forget Roman buildings. They didn't use the Ancient Greek system of ratios and proportions.
Ralph Hertle
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Actually, I asked about the distance between (i.e. spacing of) the columns. Not the proportions of the columns themselves. I was hoping that there might be a rule of thumb which says that if the columns are X wide then the proper spaceng between them would be Y x X or somesuch. I think I'd be reading those suggested references for some time before I accidentally stumbled across that information.
FoggyTown
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Yes you did.

Seems odd that you'd be so concerned about the space between them yet actively dismiss the proportions of the things themselves. Maybe you've never seen columns that were too clearly wrong.
http://www.sluicerobber.com/France/FranceImages/NimesRomanTemple.jpg
http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/NGSPOD02/102874~The-Portal-of-the-Roman-Temple-to-Bacchus-the-God-of-Wine-Posters.jpg
http://updatecenter.britannica.com/eb/image?binaryId 996&rendTypeId=4
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/08/photogalleries/lebanon/images/primary/baalbek-bacchus-big.jpg
http://blog.bjork.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/turinn-og-fleira-006.jpg
Look at pictures. Count.
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Actually, assuming that the illustrations are done to-scale, I was looking at Plate 1 and saw that a proportion could be figured out, as least accurately enough for most purposes (such as for the OP's mention of doing a box) byt measuring the circels, and the spaces between them. It'd be easier if printed out, so I haven't done the aritmetic, but it reminds me of what i'd done some yar back when fooling around with doing a 3D image of a "pseudo-Parthenon) for a game project that was in the works at the time.
Anyway, nice source, thanks for the URLs :)

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