Cat.5 Tornado-Proof houses

Greensburg, Kansas just got wiped out. There is need in the tornado-belt for tornado-proof houses. I think it can be done and done cost affordably.
The grain elevator survived. It is a cylinderical concrete structure. That is a clue.
The specs for this new type dwelling is Cat.5 and grapefruit size hail protection level 100% with only "paint damage" allowable. In fair weather, it should provide attractive, comfortable and economical living for a family of six. Larger and smaller models would follow.
A cylinder topped with a dome like a nuclear reactor containment might work. Another approach is a three sided pyramidal structure, made of reinforced concrete. A sphere on a low pedestal is another design.
Such a building design could be tested in a wind tunnel after being mathematically evaluated by structural engineers. It would be build on site in huge inverted molds, using factory-preformed steel reinforcement and poured. Then, the cured structure would be hoisted by crane and bolted to a well-anchored slab foundation. Windows would be equipped with steel storm shutters and the garage would be built into the North side with 3 block walls forming the auto storage space. A steel roll-up door would protect the garage opening.
The object is to build for not exceeding a $5 per sq. ft. premium. Lowered insurance costs and a government stipend of about $1,000 a year to owners willing to open up their dwelling to neighors for shelter in tornado attacks would substidize the additional cost of acquisition.
The government could be convinced to underwrite the R & D of this project to a 50% level. We need a small team of about 20 to do this: architect, engineer, lobbyist, patent attorney, contractors, real estate developers and so forth. The project should begin at Greensburg.
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Have a look at geodesic dome houses like www.aidomes.com . They cite examples of Florida built geodesic domes surviving hurricanes while neighboring stick-framed houses vanished.

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huge inverted molds sound impractical
perhaps consider the old inflatable dome form? see: http://www.domtec.com/process.html can't beat a dome structurally. if FRC concrete isn't strong enough (cheap enough to make strong...) it might be cheap to get structural steel curved in large quantity (all of it would be the radius of the dome) to make a steel support frame that could be installed after concreting.
it would probably be easy to chainsaw out openings for doors and windows as necessary.
I am probably under-qualified to give structural advice for the project (no license) but i would be interested to see where it goes.
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